“Human Doings”

It’s been said that most of us living in the twentieth century are not human beings but “human doings.” We spend so much time DOING that we don’t have much time left for just BEING. Many of us suffer from a fatal disease called “busyitis.” Is this poem referring to YOU??? “He never had time to pen a note. He never had time to cast a vote. He never had time to sing a song. And he never had time to right a wrong. He never had time to love or give. He never had time to really live. But from now on, he had time on end… He died today my busy friend.” Take time to take time and live your life one day at a time as if the universe depends on how you live it.   David...

Listen Twice as Much as You Talk

One of the great “success” books of all time is “The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People” by Dr. Stephen Covey. Habit  #5 is “Seek first to understand then seek to be understood.” In other words, we were given two ears and one mouth and we should use them accordingly. In a recent interview, Dr. Covey said that of the seven habits, #5 is the one Americans have the most problems with. Basically, most people are busy preparing their own speech while someone else is speaking to them. Here’s one example that supports Covey’s contention. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * An actual conversation released by the Chief of Naval Operations: Station #1: Please divert your course 15 degrees to the north to avoid a collision. Station #2: Recommend you divert YOUR course 15 degrees to the south to avoid a collision. Station #1: This is the Captain of a United States Navy ship. I say again,  divert YOUR course. Station #2: No. I say again, you divert YOUR course. Station #1: THIS IS THE AIRCRAFT CARRIER ENTERPRISE, WE ARE  A LARGE WARSHIP OF  THE UNITED STATES NAVY. DIVERT YOUR COURSE–NOW! Station #2: This is the Pudget Sound Lighthouse. It’s your call. G.O.Y.A. & S.F.T.U., David...

You Arx Important!

You arx important! Xvxn though this is an old computxr, it works quitx wxll xxcxpt for onx of thx kxys. Wx’vx wishxd many timxs that it workxd pxrfxctly. Trux, all the kxys xxcxpt onx work pxrfxctly, but just onx kxy not working makxs thx diffxrxncx. Somxtimxs, it sxxms to us that any group or txam or businxss is likx our computxr–not all thx kxy pxoplx arx working propxrly. You may say, “Wxll, I’m only onx pxrson. It won’t makx much diffxrxncx.” But for your group or txam or businxss, to bx xfficixnt, it nxxds thx activx participation of xvxry pxrson. Thx nxxt timx you think your xfforts arxn’t nxxdxd, rxmxmbxr our computxr, and say to yoursxlf, “I’m a kxy pxrson and I’m nxxdxd vxry much.” You arx important! G.O.Y.A., David...

DESIDERATA

You’ve probably seen today’s message before. It’s been on posters, greeting cards, t-shirts, etc… In the ’70s, it was put to music and became a hit song. But there’s a mystery surrounding it… . Who wrote it? . Why was it written? . Whom was it written for? . Where does it come from? If you know, let us know… DESIDERATA Go placidly amid the noise and haste and remember what peace there may be in silence. As a far as possible, without surrender, be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly; and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant; they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons, they are vexation to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter; for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time. Exercise caution in your business affairs; for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals; and everywhere life is full of heroism. Be yourself. Especially do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love; for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment, it is perennial as the grass. Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with imaginings. Many fears are born...

Wisdom vs. Knowledge

Be careful from whom you take advice. Just because they have more knowledge than you doesn’t necessarily mean that they have more WISDOM than you. For example: Once upon a time, a man lived by the side of the road and sold hot dogs. He was hard of hearing, so he had no radio. He had trouble with his eyes, so he read no newspapers. But he sold good hot dogs. He put up a sign on the highway telling how good they were. He stood by the side of the road and shouted, “Delicious hot dogs. Delicious hot dogs.” And the people bought them. He increased his meat and bun order. He bought a bigger stove to take care of his trade. One day his son came home from college. He started helping his Dad. Then something happened… The son said, “Dad, haven’t you been listening to the radio? Haven’t you been reading the newspapers? There’s a big depression going on. The European situation is terrible. The domestic situation is worse.” The father listened to his son and thought, “My son has been to college. He reads the newspaper and listens to the radio, so he ought to know.” So the father cut down on his meat and bun orders. He took down his advertising signs. And he no longer bothered to stand by the highway and tell everyone how delicious his hot dogs were. And his hot dog sales fell overnight. “You’re right son,” the father said to his boy. “We certainly are in the middle of a great depression.” In most cases, no advice is better...