Growing Through Pain

  If there is an ultimate secret to success, it is: YOU HAVE TO LEARN HOW TO BE COMFORTABLE BEING UNCOMFORTABLE. To learn something new, you have to endure the discomfort of confusion. To sell someone new, you have to feel the discomfort of rejection. To lose weight, you have to experience the discomfort of hunger. Here’s what the most famous body builder of all time has to say about this… “A beginner does eight repetitions of a certain exercise with his maximum weight on the barbell. As soon as it hurts, he thinks about stopping. I work beyond that point. “Growing is something unusual for the body when you are over eighteen. The body isn’t used to ten, eleven, or twelve reps with a maximum weight. Then I do ten or fifteen sets of this in a row. No human body was ever prepared for this and suddenly it is making itself grow to handle this new challenge, growing through this pain area. “The last three or four reps is what makes the muscle grow. This area of pain divides the champion from someone else who is not a champion. That’s what most people lack, having the guts to go on and just say they’ll go through the pain no matter what happens.” ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER Whether you’re an athlete lifting weights, a salesperson lifting the receiver of the phone or a writer lifting nothing heavier than a pen–you know about the pain. Go through the pain, n.m.w. (no matter what). You’ll be developing the ultimate secret to success–the ability to comfortable being uncomfortable. “Yard by yard, it might...

You’re Always Enough

  The #1 biggest disease that we all live with on a daily basis is “I’m not enough-it is.” The misconception: I’m not enough. I don’t do enough. I don’t have enough. The truth can be found in this story… One day a six-year-old girl asked, “Daddy where do you work?” He answered, “At the college.” “What do you do?” “I teach.” “What do you teach?” “Art.” “What do you do in art?” “I teach my students how to draw.” In total disbelief, the young girl said, “You mean they forget.” Everything we need is already inside us. You know this is true…but sometimes you forget. GOYA, David John P.S. “It has taken me many years to learn how to draw like a child.”...

The Riddle

A RIDDLE. I am your constant companion. I am your greatest helper or your heaviest burden. I will push you onward or drag you downward. I am completely at your command. Half the things you do, you might just as well turn over to me and I will be able to do them quickly and correctly. I am easily managed–you must merely be firm with me. Show me exactly how you want something done and after a few lessons I will do it automatically. I am the servant of all great people and of all failures. Those who are great, I have made great. Those who are failure, I have made failures. I am not a machine, though I work with all the precision of a machine plus with all the intelligence of a person. You may run me for profit or run me for ruin–it makes no difference to me. Take me, train me, be firm with me, and I will place the world at your feet. Be easy with me and I will destroy you. Who am I? HINT: “_____ is a cable; we weave a thread of it every day, and at last we cannot break it.” Horace Mann GOYA, David John P.S. Still reading? The answer to the riddle: I am...

Handling Critics

Are you strong enough to handle your critics? “It is not the critic who counts, not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles or where the doer of deed could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose faced is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes up short again and again because THERE IS NO EFFORT WITHOUT ERROR and shortcomings, who knows the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the high achievement of triumph and who at worst, if he fails while daring greatly, knows HIS PLACE SHALL NEVER BE WITH THOSE TIMID AND COLD SOULS WHO KNOW NEITHER VICTORY NOR DEFEAT.” Theodore Roosevelt So, next time that you face your critics, let Theodore Roosevelt’s words inspire you.   David...

Spanky

The late Earle Nightingale, writer and publisher of inspirational and motivational newsletters, once told a story about a boy named Spanky. For Spanky, school was all but impossible. he failed every subject in the eighth grade. He flunked physics in high school, getting a grade of zero. Spanky also flunked Latin, Algebra, and English. He didn’t do much better in sports. Although he did manage to make the school’s gold team, he promptly lost the only important match of the season. There was a consolation match; he lost that too. Throughout his youth Spanky was awkward socially. He was not actually disliked by other students; no one cared that much. He was astonished if a classmate ever said hello to him outside of school hours. There’s no way to tell how he might have done at dating. Spanky never once asked a girl to go out in high school. he was too afraid of being turned down. Spanky was a loser. He, his classmates… everyone knew it. So he rolled with it. Spanky had made up his mind early in life that if things were meant to work out, they would. Otherwise he would content himself with what appeared to be his inevitable mediocrity. However, one thing was important to Sparky – drawing. He was proud of his artwork. of course, no one else appreciated it. In his senior year of high school, he submitted some cartoons to the editors of the year book. the cartoons were turned down. Despite this particular rejection, Sparky was so convinced of his ability that he decided to become a professional artist. After...